Category Archives: Hip Conditions

Hip injuries can occur among athletes who use their body to perform powerful rotation and twisting movements. Whether it is from playing sports or from overuse, common injuries such as strains, fractures, and bursitis can oftentimes bench athletes and lead to additional problems. Hip pain is also a common occurrence among the older population as degenerative disease sets in from the natural wear and tear of the aging process.

A hip injury can be painful and debilitating for sufferers. Once Dr. Anz has completed a full hip examination, he will consult with you and discuss your exact injury, as well as the appropriate course of treatment. As a team, you will both work towards the most optimal outcome for your hip injury. Dr. Anz is skilled to treat a number of hip conditions, and when surgery is recommended, you can depend on his entire team to offer the best care and surgical approach to treat and manage your injury.

Hip Instability

In orthopedics, instability occurs when patients have pain or discomfort due to abnormal looseness of a joint.   When a joint completely comes out of place it is called a dislocation.  When a joint partially comes out of place it is called subluxation.  In almost all cases involving the hip, it takes a great force or special scenario to dislocate, such as a motor vehicle accident.  Hip subluxations may require less force such as in the setting of football or soccer injuries.  With these types of injury, normal stabilizing structures may be compromised, for example ligaments that normally hold the joint securely in place may become stretched or torn. Hip instability may result and in this scenario it is known as traumatic hip instability.  A second type of hip instability is called acquired hip instability.  This type arises from recurrent microtrauma to normal stabilizing structures.  This can occur through normal activities in patients with abnormal anatomy such as in the setting of femoroacetabular impingment or hip dysplasia, or it may also occur in patients who perform certain repetitive activities which involve repetitive extreme movements which may slowly stretch the joint capsule with time.

Symptoms

Hip instability may cause one or more of the following symptoms:

  • •          Pain or the feeling that the hip will dislocate with certain movements
  • •          Deep aching in the hip joint
  • •          A repetitive clicking with certain activities or movements

Diagnosis

Dr. Anz will begin with a detailed discussion regarding previous injuries, surgeries, or activities that may include repetitive motions.  He will then perform a thorough exam of the hip joint and will assess the stability by performing specific movements and a series of stability tests. X-rays will be obtained to evaluate the joint space at the hip and check for underlying bony abnormalities.  If a patient has dislocated or subluxed his/her hip, it is often important to obtain a more in-depth study such as an MRI scan or a CT scan.

Treatment

Non-surgical treatment is almost always the best first step. After an initial traumatic event, a period of rest  to allow the capsule and/or surrounding soft tissue to heal is followed by a period of strengthening with physical therapy.  In patients with acquired instability, activity modification, strengthening methods with physical therapy focusing on pelvic girdle strengthening, and anti-inflammatory medications are the initial treatments. These treatments seek to reduce hip irritation and improve dynamic stabilization (stabilization provided by muscles) for the hip joint.  If these non-surgical treatments are not successful and symptoms continue, Dr. Anz may discuss surgery as an option.

Surgical Treatment

If surgery is necessary, Dr. Anz prefers an arthroscopic approach to treat hip instability.  Arthroscopic hip surgery uses several keyhole incisions, a tiny camera, and special instruments to allow Dr. Anz a complete view of the inside of the hip joint. The exact type of surgery will depend on the condition and/or the nature of the injury. Thus, each surgical treatment will vary from patient to patient. In some cases, Dr. Anz will tighten the hip capsule (inner lining of the hip joint).  The acetabular labrum is a structure important for hip stability. If it has been injured, it sometimes requires repair.  These procedures may occur in isolation, or together, in order to stabilize the hip and improve/maintain hip motion.

Post-Operative

Dr. Anz will prescribe a progressive, thorough physical therapy program following arthroscopic surgery.  Working diligently with a therapist after a hip surgery is important to regain motion, strength, and function.  Dr. Anz and his staff will outline a customized therapy regimen to guide patients toward the best recovery possible after their surgery.

If you have any questions relating to hip instability or any other hip related injuries, please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute. 

Trochanteric Bursitis and External Snapping Hip Syndrome

Bursal tissue is present in the body to decrease friction between two adjacent moving structures. When this tissue becomes irritated (or inflammed), the condition is known as bursitis. The greater trochanter bursa lies between a tendon like structure in the thigh known as the iliotibial band and a boney prominence in the thigh known as the greater trochanter. Greater trochanteric bursitis (sometimes referred to as trochanteric bursitis) can be caused by different things in all population types and may cause significant pain. Sometimes greater trochanteric bursitis is caused by changes in a person’s walking, running, or exercise mechanics. As we get older these mechanics change as our muscle bulk and posture change. In addition to changes in posture and mechanics, bursal tissue may also become inflammed in scenarios of overuse or mechanical irritation such as in the setting of external snapping hip syndrome. External snapping hip syndrome occurs when the iliotibial band continually snaps over the greater trochanter. This can occur if the iliotibial band is too tight or too thick.

Symptoms

Symptoms of trochanteric bursitis of the hip may vary from patient to patient. Often the main symptom is pain located on the outside portion of the thigh near the boney prominence of the greater trochanter. Often patients have trouble sleeping on their side and have reproducible discomfort with pushing on the greater trochanter. Pain may also occur when an individuals attempt to run or rotate their thigh/leg. Pain can also be present when one attempts to stand after a long period of sitting.

External snapping hip syndrome is marked by a popping sensation as a patient bends and straightens their hip. As patients flex their hip, the iliotibial band slides toward the front of the thigh over the greater trochanter. As patients extend their hip, the iliotibial band slides toward the back of the thigh over the greater trochanter. In patients with external snapping hip syndrome, this sliding is accompanied by an audible or palpable “pop” which can be painful. Sometimes, patients feel that this is a sign that their hip is popping into and out of joint. However, during this process the ball and socket of the hip joint remains as it should in place.

Diagnosis

Dr. Anz may first order X-rays to rule out other bony abnormalities that may be the source of pain or snapping. He will then obtain a history and perform an examination, including the patients’ discription of the pain/symptoms and a history of sports related injuries and activity. He will examine the lower extremities in order to see which movements cause discomfort and will also perform certain physical examination tests. In some scenarios, a MRI may be important in order to rule out other injuries or ensure a correct diagnosis. Relief of pain with an injection of an anesthetic into the bursa may also be used to confirm that bursitis is the primary source of pain.

Treatment

In most circumstances trochanteric bursitis does not require surgery. Injections in addition to physical therapy is often effective, especially when bursitis is caused by hip girdle weakness or changes in posture. There are four major stabilizers of the hip joint including the muscles of the hip girdle. Therapy focusing on pelvic girdle strengthening, core strengthening, and stretching of the ITB band can often make a significant improvement in mechanics and take pressure off of the bursa. Additionally, anti-inflammatory medications (taken by mouth or rubbed onto the region) and rest from aggravating activities can greatly benefit the patient and relieve associated symptoms.

Surgical

In rare cases, Dr. Anz may recommend surgical treatment. Surgery for the treatment of bursitis is most effective when a mechanical irritating force can be removed or an inciting mechanical scenario improved, such as in the setting of external snapping hip syndrome or femoroacetabular impingment. Dr. Anz will use an arthroscopic approach in order to remove the inflamed bursa and loosen the iliotibial band. During arthroscopic surgery, he will make keyhole incisions through which he will enter small surgical instruments and a camera. He will remove the inflamed bursa and lengthen the IT band in order to relieve pressure.

Post-Operative

Following arthroscopic surgery for trochanteric bursitis, Dr. Anz will prescribe a brief period of rest followed by a physical therapy program to help restore strength and motion. Patients often make great progress during physical therapy and can resume normal activities within 6 to 8 weeks.

For more information on trochanteric bursitis of the hip, or if you have any other questions regarding surgical treatments for the hip, please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute. 

PVNS

Pigmented villonodular synovitis, or PVNS, is a disease caused by the abnormal growth of the hip joint’s lining tissue, known as the synovium. Excessive growth of this tissue leads to inflammation in the joint causing pain, tenderness, and stiffness. The condition occurs most commonly in patients in their 30s and 40s, but the actual cause of PVNS is still unknown.

PVNS is identified in two different forms:

  • Localized – Pain and swelling occurs in just one area of the joint, and responds well to treatment.
  • Diffuse – More common than localized PVNS, diffuse PVNS involves the entire joint, and can be more destructive and difficult to treat.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PVNS include hip pain, weakness, and stiffness of the joint. Patients with localized PVNS may experience joint locking, a catching sensation or a feeling of instability. Patients with diffuse PVNS may experience a gradual onset in symptoms.

Diagnostic Testing

PVNS may not necessarily be evident on a standard X-ray, though an X-ray could show other potential problems that could be causing the hip pain. Dr. Anz may choose to order an MRI scan that will more accurately show evidence of a nodular mass with bone changes if the condition is localized PVNS. If the condition is diffuse PVNS, an MRI will show a thickening of the joint lining or an extensive mass, potentially with destructive bone changes.

In some cases Dr. Anz may perform a procedure called a joint aspiration, whereby he releases fluid from the hip joint. Typically with PNVS cases, the joint fluid appears bloody. A biopsy is the confirmatory test for PVNS of the hip.

Treatment

Surgery is the best option to treat a diagnosis of PVNS. Dr. Anz will remove the painful, inflamed synovial lining through a procedure called a synovectomy, which, can be done via arthroscopic or open surgery.

In an arthroscopic synovectomy, Dr. Anz surgically removes the affected lining with the mass only using small incisions. This is the most common way to treat localized PVNS. However in the instance of diffuse PVNS, a total synovectomy may be required, which is an open surgery procedure that removes the mass and the entire joint lining.

Post-Op

Following a synovectomy, patients should avoid full weight bearing as discussed with Dr. Anz at the first post-operative visit. For patients recovering from arthroscopic procedures, the recovery time is shorter, and will involve a short course of physical therapy before resuming normal daily activities. However for those who undergo the open procedure, a more extensive physical therapy program will be prescribed to prevent post-op stiffness and a return to normal mobility, often taking months.

For more information on PVNS (pigmented villonodular synovitis) or other disorders of the hip, please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute. 

Internal Snapping Hip Syndrome/Psoas Impingement

A condition of the hip which can affect recreational and professional athletes alike is internal snapping hip syndrome. This syndrome is marked by snapping of the iliopsoas over the front of the hip joint. The iliopsoas is a muscle, also referred to as the hip flexor, which connects the bone in the thigh (femur) to the lumbar spine. It starts as a muscle at the lumbar spine and transitions to a tendon as it courses to its attachment on the femur. At the hip joint, there is a significant portion which is tendon and a significant portion which is still muscle. The tendon portion often runs directly over the front of the hip joint, and sometimes this tendon can create a popping sensation as it moves across the hip joint. Some patients describe this popping as their hip popping out of joint, but most often this popping represents motion of the tendon alone. In some instances, the muscle and tendon of the hip flexor can become tight and irritated (inflammed). This is often associated with groin pain and a snapping sensation which can be quite bothersome. In severe instances, a tight iliopsoas with long standing popping can lead to inflammation and/or damage of the acetabular labrum, also creating hip pain and irritation. This is condition is known as psoas impingement. Without proper treatment and rest, the labrum can become damaged to the point where it tears.

Symptoms

Internal snapping hip syndrome is a precursor to psoas impingment. Symptoms of internal snapping hip syndrome include popping located in the groin. At times the popping can be accompanied by a sharp pain. With time as the snapping progresses to psoas impingement a constant, deep ache within the groin may develop. Patients may also feel tightness along the front portion of the hip joint. Often symptoms associated with internal snapping hip syndrome and psoas impingement are increased with activities and sports.

Diagnosis

Dr. Anz obtains X-ray’s of the hip and pelvis to evaluate a given patient’s anatomy and look for abnormalities which can predispose one to hip impingement. He will obtain a comprehensive history to consider what types of activities you participate in and how they may affect your hip. He will conduct a physical examination that will evaluate the status of your hip flexor. The Thomas test is a physical examination test that will allow him to determine how tight a patient’s iliopsoas tendon/muscle is. He will also listen for any sound that the joint may make during his examination. If appropriate, he will order an MRI to assess the iliopsoas as well as the acetabular labrum.

Treatment

Upon diagnosis of psoas impingement, Dr. Anz will begin to discuss treatment options. In most situations, a patient can recover fully from impingement without the need to have surgery. Non-surgical treatment techniques which Dr. Anz will recommend include rest, the use of anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and/or injection of steroids into the tendon sheath to decrease inflammation and alleviate pain. A thorough stretching and strengthening program is often the best first step to making patient’s better. A therapist is often necessary to help assist with this progress. If these treatment techniques are attempted and are not successful, Dr. Anz may begin to discuss surgery with the patient.

Surgical Treatment

If surgery is required to treat psoas impingement, Dr. Anz will perform it arthroscopically. During an arthroscopic surgery Dr. Anz will insert a camera and small surgical instruments through 2 to 3 small incisions along the hip. If FAI impingement is also involved, he will address this and any damage created at the same time. Releaseing the psoas tendon, medically known as “fractional lengthening,” involves cutting the tendon portion at the hip joint while preserving the portion which is still muscle at the hip joint. Fractional lengthening may cause some future weakness in hip flexion strength.

Post-Operative

Physical therapy is a crucial part of the healing process for patients in order to make a full recovery. A progressive rehabilitation program will be prescribed at your first post-operative visit with Dr. Anz. Initially, the therapy will focus on slowly returning motion back to the injured hip. After motion is regained, patients will follow a progressive strengthening program, and eventually, a return to normal activities.

If you believe you are suffering from Psoas impingement, or would like additional information on the causes of hip pain, please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute. 

Loose Bodies

Sometimes structures can become dislodged and mobile inside a joint.  When this occurs these structures are called loose bodies.  Loose bodies can be made of bone, cartilage, or items which do not normally belong in a joint.  They can arise from an injury or from the wear and tear changes which joints go through with time.  For some patients, loose bodies within a joint do not cause pain or disability.  They can go unnoticed for years.  However, for some people loose bodies can cause significant problems.  Some individuals with loose bodies in a joint will find that with certain movements mechanical symptoms, such as popping, catching or locking, will occur. This is may be caused by these loose fragments moving to different regions or becoming lodged between two structures in a joint.  In a hip, loose bodies can be a source of significant discomfort and pain.  When loose bodies are determined to be the cause of pain, they can be surgically removed.  Without treatment symptoms may continue to worsen and healthy articular cartilage may become further damaged contributing to further joint degeneration.

Symptoms

When loose bodies within a joint do cause symptoms, these symptoms often occur after reproducible specific movements.  Patients often begin to recognize pain with certain activities or motions and begin to alter their movement or activity.  The most common symptoms associated with loose bodies are:

  • Sharp pain during a specific motion
  • A feeling of “catching” inside the hip
  • A feeling of “locking” inside of the hip
  • Sensations of instability
  • A constant dull ache

Diagnosis

Loose bodies often arise from a specific injury. For this reason, Dr. Anz will get a full patient history to understand any previous injuries which may have occurred.  He will follow this with a physical examination and evaluation of X-rays and potentially a MRI to determine where the loose bodies reside and if there are any additional injuries to assess.  Typically, the only treatment for symptomatic loose bodies is surgical removal.

Surgical Removal

Dr. Anz prefers an arthroscopic surgical approach to remove loose bodies from the hip joint. It is not always possible to remove all loose bodies depending on a given scenario.  During arthroscopic hip surgery, keyhole incisions are made around the hip through which a small camera and small surgical instruments are used. The camera allows for visual location of loose fragments of cartilage and bone.   After visualization, grasping instruments may be used to remove these fragments.  During this process he may also use additional tools to smooth and reshape rough areas that have suffered damage due to the loose bodies.

Post-Operative

Following arthroscopic hip surgery, Dr. Anz will prescribe a progressive rehabilitation plan whereas the patient will work closely with a therapist to gain range of motion, strength, and movement. Typically, patients are able to resume their normal activities within 6-8 weeks following surgery.

If you have any questions regarding hip pain or arthroscopic hip surgery, or would like additional information on loose bodies, please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute. 

Gluteus Medius/Minimus Tears

The gluteus muscles are a group of muscles that allow an individual to partake in rigorous activity such as running and jumping. These muscles are broad, strong muscles that make up the outer buttocks in the human body. There are two muscles to consider:

  • The gluteus medius muscle is located at the outer part of the hip.
  • The gluteus minimus is the smallest of the gluteal muscles and is located immediately beneath the gluteus medius.

Together, these muscles work to straighten the hip during activity, stabilize the pelvis and assist with outer movements of the hip. A tear in the gluteus medius muscle typically occurs at the area where the muscle attaches to the femur bone. Gluteus tears can occur from traumatic injuries which cause the tendon to peel off of the bone. However, most gluteal tears are degenerative and are caused by chronic inflammation from repetitive movements and overuse. This can sometimes be associated with trochanteric bursitis of the hip.

Symptoms

The primary symptoms of a gluteal tear include an abnormal gait, hip pain, and lower back pain. Symptoms become worse with long periods of sitting, standing, and walking. Some patients experience hip tenderness when lying on the affected side. Symptoms will also depend on the grade of the injury:

  • Grade 1: Mild pain with little or no loss of mobility
  • Grade 2: Partial tear with mild pain and a noticeable loss in strength and flexibility
  • Grade 3: Full/complete tear; severe pain coupled with a complete loss of strength; limited mobility

Diagnostic Testing

A tear of the gluteus muscle can usually be discovered through a physical exam. Dr. Anz will conduct a series of tests to check for tenderness over the lateral hip area. Additional strength tests may reveal pain and weakness with resisted hip abduction. To rule out other injuries and conditions, Dr. Anz could order an X-ray or MRI to take a further look inside the hip and give a final diagnosis on the grade of the tear.

Treatment

Non-Surgical

For Grade 1 tears, conservative measures will be prescribed to treat the injury, such as using ice and anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce pain and inflammation. It’s recommended that patients should avoid sports or major physical activities and movement to allow healing to occur.

Surgical

In severe Grade 2 or in Grade 3 tears, Dr. Anz will repair the tear endoscopically, whereby tiny incisions are made and the torn gluteus muscle is reattached with sutures. This is minimally invasive and is achieved through the use of the camera. Repair of the tendon back to its attachment site on the greater trochanter allows for healing and restoration of function. The body will mend the torn tendon edge over a period of many weeks.

Post-Op

Dr. Anz will order a complete physical therapy plan after surgery. Rehabilitation of a gluteus tear focuses on gentle hip range of motion and progressive strengthening exercises, with an emphasis on hip abductor, extensor, and internal rotator muscles. Balance exercises will be introduced as strength returns.

For more information on gluteus medius and gluteus minimus tears of the hip, or for questions on arthroscopic hip surgery, please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute. 

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a hip condition where the bones of the hip joint rub together in an abnormal way. This involves the femur, bone in the the thigh, and acetabulum, the cup of the hip. FAI most often occurs when the shape of a patient’s bones are slightly abnormal. This abnormality is often either a bump on the front of the femur, often called a CAM, or an area of excess bone involving the acetabulum, often called a PINCER. FAI typically occurs when patients with moderately or severely abnormal anatomy are performing normal activity or when patients with mildly abnormal anatomy are performing activities involving extreme ranges of motion. FAI may occur in active adults, recreational athletes, or high-level athletes and sometimes causes difficulty in individuals who use a repetitive, consistent motion of the hips. The interaction of the femur and acetabulum in FAI creates friction resulting in a pinching mechanism as well as a levering mechanism in some instances. These forces can slowly damage the cartilage or other structures of the hip joint over time and lead to hip pain.

Symptoms

When patients have Cam and/or Pincer abnormalities typically the actual impingement occurs with certain hip positions: most frequently hip flexion, adduction, and internal rotation. For this reason, patients with FAI do not always present with immediate symptoms. Often patients have added an activity or changed their activity to one where impingement occurs and subsequently have a gradual increase in pain. Certain positions will often produce a sharp pain. As more damage occurs, patients will often develop a deep ache in the groin. Decreased mobility at the hip can be an associated symptom. Patients will have difficulty squatting/sitting for long periods of time or standing after they are in a squatting/sitting position.

Diagnosis

Dr. Anz will perform a thorough physical exam and will ask a series of questions relating to the type and level of pain, as well as assess the exact movements that increase pain levels. Through a complete physical examination, he will be able to better determine where the pain is originating. Dr. Anz may order a series of X-rays to evaluate for the presence of the bony abnormalities. Certain X-rays are important to evaluate for a Cam and/or Pincer lesion. In some cases, an MRI will be requested in order to evaluate soft tissue structure of the hip, as they can be damaged in the presence of FAI.

Treatment

Most cases of FAI can be successfully managed with conservative treatment. If a non-operative treatment regimen has not been tried, Dr. Anz will first recommend this approach. This treatment course usually includes: activity modification (to avoid positions of impingement), avoidance of painful activities, non-steroid anti-inflammatory medication, and physical therapy to help strength the hip and core muscles therefore reducing the stress placed at the hip joint. Sometimes Dr. Anz may recommend a hip injection into the joint at times to help with diagnosis and at times for treatment purposes. If pain can not be managed with non-operative treatment Dr. Anz will discuss surgical options that exist for this condition.

Surgical Treatments

Dr. Anz utilizes an arthroscopic approach for FAI. During hip arthroscopy, Dr. Anz will make two small portal incisions. Using a small camera he will maintain direct visualization through one of the portals and will use the remaining portal to work with a series of tools. With these tools he will remove the excess bone at the femoral head and/or acetabulum to help reduce the friction at the hip joint.

Post-Operative

Dr. Anz strongly recommends a period of rehabilitation and/or physical therapy following hip arthroscopy. It is important that patients follow diligently their course of rehabilitation. Physical therapy following hip surgery is specifically designed to allow you the best chance at a speedy recovery and return to normal daily activities.

For more information regarding FAI related injuries please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute. 

Chondral Defects of the Hip

Articular cartilage is a smooth but firm tissue that lines the joints of the body and allows for a reduction in friction. This substance covers the ends of the bones that form the hip joint (femur and acetabulum), allowing for smooth motion between the ends of the bones when the hips move. This tissue also acts as a “shock absorber” by protecting the joint during impact activities such as running and jumping.

A chondral defect is a condition of the hip that occurs when there is a defect in the articular cartilage. The defect and/or damage to the articular cartilage can result in a number of conditions leading to various symptoms. Degenerative diseases such as arthritis and osteoarthritis are the most common conditions of the hip in which articular cartilage has suffered damage. In some instances, cartilage can potentially wear down and break off or tear away from the bone. Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), can also lead to chondral defects within the joint.

Normal wear and tear that comes with aging is a common culprit for chondral damage in the hip. Damage to the articular cartilage within the hip can also occur as a result of a direct blow to the hip joint, such as with a fall or a traumatic accident (i.e. motor vehicle accident). These defects can also result from repetitive motion, overuse, and stress from sports or other activities.

Symptoms

The most common symptom of a chondral defect is pain, which can almost feel like a “catch” within the joint.

Diagnostic Testing

Dr. Anz will review the patient’s background including a complete history and discuss any injury that may have taken place to cause damage to the hip joint. Typically an MRI is the most effective method to view the articular cartilage within the hip joint.

Treatment

Non-Surgical

In less severe cases, surgery for chondral defects can be avoided and patients are able to manage their pain with non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory medications, ice, and exercises as prescribed by a physical therapist. Injections into the hip can also help alleviate symptoms.

Surgical

Cartilage has a poor blood supply and does not have the ability to repair itself. In cases of severe chondral injury, surgery will likely be recommended with the goal of minimizing symptoms. Some procedures also have the capacity to help restore the area with scar tissue that behaves like cartilage. These surgical procedures can minimize the symptoms associated with cartilage defects and allow for a better quality of life. The exact surgical technique can vary based on the size and severity of the defect. Dr. Anz typically uses a variety of techniques:

  • Chondroplasty is an arthroscopic surgery which removes and cleans out, or debrides, any unstable pieces of cartilage or foreign bodies within the joint. When a patient is diagnosed with “loose bodies”, a chondroplasty and loose body removal is typically the procedure that is used.This usually is the first approach to treat damaged cartilage. It offers a shorter recovery time and is less invasive.
  • Microfracture is another approach that has been developed to help cartilage grow. During the procedure, tiny holes are made in the underlying bone stimulating stem cells within the marrow to approach the site of injury, creating new cartilage growth.

Post-Op

A rehabilitation and physical therapy program will be prescribed at your first post-operative visit with Dr. Anz. Initially, the therapy will focus on slowly returning motion back to the injured hip. After that is achieved, you will follow a progressive strengthening program to protect the repaired hip and avoid future damage or degenerative issues.

For additional resources on chondral defects and chondral injuries, please contact the Gulf Breeze, Florida orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Adam Anz located at the Andrews Institute.